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Feb
17
Brady Wilson

Click here to download Juice Inc.’s revolutionary white paper on employee engagement, The Engagement Paradox!

At Juice, we see a common dynamic playing itself out in today’s workplace.

Large numbers of employees are engaged—at least, by the popular definition of “engagement.” They will say, stay and strive:Brady Wilson loves Boston!

  • say good things about the organization,
  • stay with you, and
  • strive to do their best.

But despite their loyalty, commitment and soldiering on, engaged employees often feel overwhelmed and inadequately fueled.

It’s an understandable position to be in. I personally felt that very dynamic when I ran the Boston Marathon in 2012.

I trained hard. But the race was such a struggle for me that, despite having fallen in love with Boston that year, I told myself I would never again run another marathon.

The best way I can describe that gruelling four-hours-and-thirty-minutes is that I was engaged—but not energized.

“Never again will I run another marathon,” I told myself.

And then, in 2013, the bombs went off.

Boston tragedy

Most of the 22 victims had severe leg injuries. As someone who loves to run—lives to run—this is what gripped my heart.

And something rose up within me.

I felt solidarity with those runners. And I told myself “I am SO running in Boston next year. I will NOT be intimidated by this!”

With little time to prepare, I ran a marathon, hoping to achieve a time that would qualify me for Boston in 2014.

When I received my letter of acceptance, I was ecstatic. Now I would have a chance to show my love for Boston: its victims, its runners, and its fans.

Brady loves Boston

Training for the 2014 Boston marathon was full of struggles. I ended up with a hip injury. I tried physio, chiro...every way to heal that you can imagine.

I considered bowing out of the race.

But after consulting with my wife, I decided to go: “Even if I can’t run,” I thought, “at least I can cheer my fellow runners on and be part of the great crowd. And who knows? Maybe my body will find a way to finish the race, injury and all.”

To show my solidarity with Boston, I decided to print a message on a Canadian flag on the front and back of my shirt: Brady loves Boston.

Throughout the entire race, I heard very personal cheering. One million spectators lined the road, shouting “Boston loves you right back, Brady!” I was shaken—and driven by so much personal encouragement.

Why? When a complete stranger reaches out to you and says (with feeling) “We love you”—well, it does something to you.

Energy surge

The energy I felt was like nothing I’d ever experienced in my life. It got me through the painful halfway point and kept up my momentum.

I never stopped: I kept running, fuelled by the energy of the crowd I felt so connected to.

And guess what? I ran a fantastic race: 3:48, which was three quarters of an hour faster than the last time I ran it!

Life lesson

In the days and months that followed, I compared my “grind-it-out” Boston Marathon of 2012 to this freakishly energizing Boston Marathon of 2014.

In 2012, I burned the fuel of engagement, of obligation and compulsion. I was engaged, but I was not energized.

But in 2014, I burned the fuel of passion, purpose and connection that both energized and engaged me.

Learn to fuel energy in your organization

This very personal experience inspired me to write The Engagement Paradox.

This white paper explains why traditional employee engagement initiatives don’t work; and how to use brain science principles to help organizations shift their strategies.

I am also in the midst of writing a book on this very topic—an activity I find not only engaging, but incredibly energizing! (We will keep you updated on the release date.)

I invite you to learn more about how energy fuels high performance.

Download The Engagement Paradox now!

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Brady Wilson

Brady Wilson

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