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Jun
19
Alex Somos

Graduation time is the season for clichéd advice (“follow your dreams,” anyone?): which is certainly well-meaning, but not very practical for new graduates about to enter the workforce.

With that in mind, here are four tips to help you (or the new grad in your life) survive and thrive in the workplace.


  1. Regularly check your energy levels
    Once in a while, take a minute at the end of your work day to check how you’re feeling. Do you still have mental and physical energy left for family, friends, shopping, making dinner and social activities? If you do, that’s a good sign you’re working for a good manager and/or organization: one who values work/life balance.

    If you consistently feel downtrodden and exhausted, don’t be afraid to look elsewhere for work: believe it or not, there are employers out there who believe in keeping their employees energized, motivated and happy.
     
  2. Steer clear of negativity
    Inter-office friction can infect any workplace, depleting people’s energy levels and productivity—and making Monday through Friday unbearable for all involved.

    Instead of running toward drama, stay away. Don’t get caught up in the negativity and politicking. Especially as a new graduate, your main focus should be your job, learning how to do it well, and building your career. Trust us, your manager will appreciate it.

    Moreover, don’t listen to all the naysayers. There will always be negative folks who say certain things can’t be done. Try to approach everything in an unguarded fashion: by keeping an open mind, you are allowing for new ideas to flourish and positive change to occur.
     
  3. Become fluent in conversation
    Too often, people dismiss communication as a “soft skill,” less important than skills related to monetary gain like project management, computer programming or accounting. But being an efficient communicator can actually be your ticket to greater opportunities.

    It may sound easy, but communicating with others—particularly face-to-face—involves quite a bit of finesse. Choosing the right words, listening with our minds and hearts instead of simply our ears, and getting our message across clearly are critical skills that can make or break a project. Miscommunication can lead to misunderstanding and arguments—and in the workplace, that can mean the end of a decent working relationship. So take time to hone your conversation skills—every day.
     
  4. Appreciate diverse thinkers
    As innovation becomes increasingly critical to an organization’s ability to remain competitive, employers are beginning to appreciate the value that their employees can bring them in the way of ideas.

    There are often a few oddballs in the office—but that doesn’t mean they can’t contribute in a meaningful way. When it comes to innovative thinking, sometimes all it takes is one over-the-top idea to springboard everyone else’s ideas.

When you’re looking for ideas, consider the value of bringing together a group of diverse thinkers. They just may be your best source of inspiration.

What other practical words of advice would you have for new grads entering the workforce?

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Brady Wilson

Brady Wilson

Co-Founder of Juice Inc, Thought Leader & Author

Alex Somos

Alex Somos

Co-Founder of Juice Inc.

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